Ontario docs are leaving – patients have trouble finding good doctors











{July 6, 2012}   Quebec Fairmont Le Chateau Frontenac partners with clinic to offer ‘medical tourism package’

 

Quebec City hotel partners with clinic to offer ‘medical tourism package’

 
on July 5, 2012 for The Canadian Press
 

QUEBEC – The Fairmont Le Chateau Frontenac hotel has partnered with a private radiology clinic in Quebec City to offer a “medical tourism package,” claiming this is the first of its kind in Canada.

The luxury hotel says clients will receive “VIP treatment” that includes wait-free access to health professionals and state-of-the-art medical equipment.

The package, available only to Canadian residents, includes a minimum two-night stay in the hotel, breakfasts and transportation to the clinic, Radiologie et imagerie medicale de la capitale, seven kilometres away.

The price starts at about $800, said hotel spokesperson Genevieve Parent, and does not include the cost of medical tests, some of which may be covered by private insurance.

Imaging procedures offered include mammography, bone density tests, pulmonary CT scans, abdominal and pelvic ultrasounds, and “virtual colonoscopy” by CT scan.

The idea for the package, launched last month, came from the clinic, which was receiving out-of-town clients and wanted to partner with the hotel, Parent said.

“It’s a different offering (from the Frontenac’s other packages) but we hope it will respond to a need from some of our guests,” she said.

The target market is “the business or leisure client that has a busy life and really doesn’t have much time to do these types of exams,” Parent said. “There might be wait lists where they live as well.”

Dr. Jacques Levesque, director of the clinic and president-elect of the Canadian Association of Radiologists, said the package is the first in Canada focused on medical imaging.

 

Thousands leaving Canada for medical care

 
Written by Jered Stuffco on July 13, 2012
 

VANCOUVER | A new report from the Fraser Institute estimates that nearly 50,000 Canadians went to the United States and other nations for medical care last year.

According to the conservative think-tank, the numbers raise concerns about quality of care, wait times and poor outcomes in Canada.

The report estimates that 46,169 Canadians went to other nations for medical procedures in 2011, which marked an increase in some provinces over the previous year.

The numbers were crunched from annual Fraser Institute wait times data and procedure information from the Canadian Institute for Health Information.

The year-over-year estimates are as follows:

  • British Columbia: 5,565 to 9,180
  • Saskatchewan: 943 to 1,221
  • Manitoba: 933 to 1,436
  • New Brunswick: 282 to 526
  • Nova Scotia: 851 to 1,271
  • Prince Edward Island: 44 to 54
  • Newfoundland and Labrador: 130 to 433

On the opposite side of the spectrum was Ontario, which saw a decrease of 23,192 to 18,172 during the same period.

Meanwhile, 2011 estimates in Alberta (9,267) and Quebec (4,600) could not be made to the year before due to a dearth in data.

“In some cases, these patients needed to leave Canada due to a lack of available resources or a lack of appropriate procedure [or] technology,” said the report.

“In others, their departure will have been driven by a desire to return more quickly to their lives, to seek out superior quality care, or perhaps to save their own lives or avoid the risk of disability. Clearly, the number of Canadians who ultimately receive their medical care in other countries is not insignificant.”

Click to read the report in full.

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